Finding the right insurance for you

Finding the right insurance for you

Finding the right insurance for youHETAS Insurance regularly review the products we offer to ensure the polices we arrange continue to meet your needs. We are delighted to tell you that with effect from renewal all existing policies will be transferred to our new policy provided by RSA.

This new policy contains a number of changes that are focused around our desire to continually enhance the cover provided as well as reducing the administration burden on you.

Benefits include:

Cover for broader business descriptions.

The new product can accommodate much broader business activities and there is no longer a requirement that solid fuel installations make up 50% of your work. The product accommodates trades such as plumbing, gas work, and structural building work. This means that if you are a new HETAS member with an existing trade and are diversifying into solid fuel installations you can arrange cover via this policy. Existing HETAS registrants that are looking to expand into additional trades can also be covered under this policy.

More flexible package

The RSA product is made up of optional covers meaning it can be more easily tailored to your individual needs.

Depending on your individual circumstances this could result in a premium saving as you only pay for the cover you need.

Simplified approach to work at height.

Work at height can now be covered as standard up to ten metres with flexibility to cover work at greater height.

No more lengthy height work questions.

Reduced escape of water excess

Escape of water excess is £250 even if wet works are undertaken (plumbing etc.)

Competitive prices

Insurers set their prices based on the level of risk they believe a particular sector is exposed too. We are confident that RSA’s understanding of the sector will result in competitive prices for HETAS members.

The updated policy is available for all existing customers with effect from renewal. For more information please get in touch with your HETAS Insurance team.

 

 

HETAS Insurance Services is a trading name of Jelf Insurance Brokers Ltd, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). Not all products and services offered are regulated by the FCA.  Registered in England and Wales number 0837227. Registered Office: Hillside Court, Bowling Hill, Chipping Sodbury, BS37 6JX. FP18.221

 

Cyber risks in the construction industry

Cyber risks in the construction industry

cyber risks in the construction industryConstruction output in the UK is more than £110 billion per annum and contributes 7% of GDP [1]. It’s a hands on industry; building infrastructures, mining, quarrying, forestry, supply of products, as well as maintenance and disposal, for both business and individual clients. So you might be surprised to hear that an industry that constructs so much offline, faces significant risks online.

According to UK government statistics, in 2015, 15% of construction business premises were affected by online crime. That means 1 in 6 constructions firms [2].  A study from The Home Office from that same year shows there were 77,000 incidents of online crime against construction companies, in which 71% were computer viruses and 10% were hackers [3].

Construction industry data is more valuable than you think.

Think about your company client base, the current, past and future projects, and all the information you hold. ‘The leaking of market-sensitive information, intellectual property or other confidential information could have serious financial consequences for your business.’ [4]

One of the most publicised and embarrassing security breaches came back in 2013, when hackers believed to be working from China stole a construction company’s blueprints for the building of the new Australian Security Intelligence Headquarters. [5]

It isn’t just hackers you need to be protecting yourself against either, multiple sets of employees, consultants and contractors, could all provide an element of risk when it comes to a data breach. Don’t forget, it is a legal requirement to ensure that all data is held securely and is used in the correct way.

GDPR and Construction

It is important to understand the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and what it means to your business. As the construction industry faces a migration towards more digitalised, integrated and complex systems, the potential impact and risk to the data being held by companies is increasing.

GDPR is coming. In an effort to make sure companies are doing everything they can to protect their data – this EU legislation is coming in to force from May 2018 and companies need to be ready. Bringing penalties of up to €20 million, or, if higher 4% of total revenues for those who don’t comply.

Building a safer cyber environment

Keeping systems up-to-date, having back-ups, secure Wi-Fi, installing anti-virus and building an internal policy to educate staff all helps to reduce risk. Perhaps start by having a frank discussion with your IT support provider to ensure you are doing everything you can.

Here are a few more tips to help protect your business:

  • Consider getting the ISO 27001 certification, which proves you are following the necessary security policies and procedures. [6]
  • Make sure your finance team are well trained and on the lookout for phishing scams.
  • If you have multiple connected users, make sure you install a privileged account security solution on each device. It will help to reduce your chances of sensitive data being accessed. It also makes it easier to control should a device be mislaid or stolen.
  • Install software that provides real-time protection and automatically receives the most up-to-date malware definitions. [7]
  • Prepare a plan for how the business will respond to an incident.’ [8]

Why not get in touch with your HETAS Insurance team on 08455 085 734 to see how they can help you.

 

HETAS Ltd is an introducer appointed representative of Jelf Insurance Brokers Limited. Hetas Insurance Services is a trading name of Jelf Insurance Brokers Ltd (Reg No. 0837227), which is part of Jelf Group plc (Reg No. 2975376) and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).  Registered address: Hillside Court, Bowling Hill, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6JX (Registered in England and Wales). Not all products and services offered are regulated by the FCA. JIB226.09.17

 

[1] https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk/wiki/UK_construction_industry

[2] http://www.infrastructure-intelligence.com/article/may-2016/one-six-construction-firms-affected-cyber-crime

[3] http://www.theconstructionindex.co.uk/news/view/cyber-criminals-target-construction

[4] http://constructionblog.practicallaw.com/it-is-not-a-matter-of-if-but-when-cyber-security-in-the-construction-industry/ 

[5] http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/chinese-hackers-steal-blueprints-for-australian-spy-hq-8633757.html

[6] https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/blog/how-iso-27001-can-help-to-achieve-gdpr-compliance/

[7] http://www.isqft.com/start/blog-data-breaches-cyber-security-and-the-construction-industry/

[8] http://www.isqft.com/start/blog-data-breaches-cyber-security-and-the-construction-industry/ 

 

 


 

Focus on: Working at height

Focus on: Working at heightWorking at Height Image

Falls from height are one of the biggest causes of workplace fatalities and major injuries. In fact, statistics from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) state that in 2015/16 144 workers were killed at work in Great Britain[1] and 26% of these fatalities were due to falls from height.  To help you protect your workers the team from HETAS Insurance have listed some key questions and answers about working from height.

Q Do the regulations apply to me?

A If you are an employer or you control work at height the regulations apply to you. You must make sure work is properly planned, supervised and carried out by competent people. This includes using the right type of equipment for working at height.

Take a sensible, pragmatic approach when considering precautions for work at height. Factors to consider include the height of the task, the duration and frequency and the condition of the surface being worked on. See the risk assessment website for more advice by visiting: www.hse.gov.uk/risk/risk-assessment.htm.

Q How do I decide who should work at height?

 You should make sure that people with sufficient skills, knowledge and experience are employed to perform the task, or, if they are being trained or are not competent you should ask yourself “should I be doing this work, or a different member of my team?” A competent person is someone who has the necessary skills, experience and knowledge to manage health and safety. Guidance on appointing a competent person can be found at www.hse.gov.uk/competence.

When a more technical level of competence is required, for example, drawing up a plan for assembling a complex scaffold, existing training and certification schemes drawn up by trade associations and industries is one way to help demonstrate competence.

Q What steps do I need to take to help protect people?

A   Always consider measures that protect everyone who is at risk (collective protection) before measures that protect only the individual (personal protection).

Collective protection is equipment that does not require the person working at height to act to be effective, for example a permanent or temporary guard rail.

Personal protection is equipment that requires the individual to act to be effective. An example is putting on a safety harness correctly and connecting it via an energy-absorbing lanyard to a suitable anchor point.

Remember you have a duty of care towards all individuals and so you should:

  • Take into account weather conditions that could compromise worker safety.
  • Check that the place where work at height is to be undertaken is safe. The place where people will work at height needs to be checked every time, before use.
  • Stop materials or objects from falling or, if it is not reasonably practicable to prevent objects from falling, take suitable and sufficient measures to make sure no one can be injured, like using exclusion zones to keep people away or using mesh on scaffolding to stop materials such as bricks from falling off.
  • Store materials and objects safely so they won’t cause injury if they are disturbed or collapse.
  • Plan for emergencies and rescue; for example, agree upon a set procedure for evacuation. Think about foreseeable situations and make sure employees know the emergency procedures. Don’t just rely entirely on emergency services for rescue in your plan.

Failure to consider precautions and to properly plan for working at height can lead to serious incidents. A Birmingham employer was ordered to undertake 120 hours unpaid community work and pay costs of £1152.24 following a fall that left his apprentice with life changing injuries[2].

Q How do I choose the right equipment to use?

A  When selecting equipment for work at height, you must:

  • Provide the most suitable equipment appropriate for the work;
  • Take account of factors such as:
    • The working conditions (such as weather);
    • The nature, frequency and duration of the work;  and
    • The risks to the safety of everyone where the work equipment will be used.

Where the safety of the work equipment depends on how it has been installed or assembled, you should ensure it is not used until it has been inspected in that position by a competent person.

Any equipment exposed to conditions that may cause it to deteriorate and result in a dangerous situation, should be inspected at suitable intervals appropriate to the environment and use. Do an inspection every time something happens that may affect the safety or stability of the equipment, such as adverse weather or accidental damage.

You are required to keep a record of any inspection for types of work equipment including:

  • guard rails,
  • toe boards,
  • barriers or similar collective means of protection;
  • working platforms (any platform used as a place of work or as a means of getting to and from work, like a gangway) that are fixed (such as a scaffold around a building) or mobile (eg a mobile elevated working platform (MEWP) or scaffold tower); or a ladder.
  • Any working at height platform used for construction work and from which a person could fall more than 2 metres must be inspected:
  • After assembly in any position;
  • After any event liable to have affected its stability; and
  • At intervals not exceeding seven days.

By taking appropriate action to assess the risks faced in your business and then implementing steps to reduce them, not only are you meeting your legal requirements you are also protecting your employees. Don’t forget if you are planning to work at height you will need to arrange appropriate insurance. Why not get in touch with your HETAS Insurance team on 08455 085 734 to see how they can help you.

HETAS Ltd is an introducer appointed representative of Jelf Insurance Brokers Limited. Hetas Insurance Services is a trading name of Jelf Insurance Brokers Ltd (Reg No. 0837227), which is part of Jelf Group plc (Reg No. 2975376) and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).  Registered address: Hillside Court, Bowling Hill, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6JX (Registered in England and Wales). Not all products and services offered are regulated by the FCA. JIB157.06.17

Source Zywave

[1] http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/causinj/

[2] http://press.hse.gov.uk/2017/electrician-fined-after-apprentice-left-with-life-changing-injuries/

 

Keep your mobiles safe from hacking

Keep your mobiles safe from hackingHETAS Insurance Services Logo

In this latest article from HETAS Insurance Services, the team provide tips on how to keep your mobiles safe from hacking.

As we become ever reliant on our smartphones and mobile devices for running a business for example; storing client’s details, accessing work emails and booking appointments, there is also an increasing threat of a cyber-attack.

A hacker can attack a smartphone or other mobile device without the owner’s knowledge and gain access to his or her messages, contacts, emails and even his or her location.

A case study

Louis, was travelling for business and decided to use his work phone to browse the internet via an open network. While on the open network, Louis checked his work email and browsed some websites online, including his personal bank account.

When Louis returned to his usual place of work the next day, many of his co-workers told him that they had received suspicious emails that appeared to come from him. In addition, Louis found that several strange charges had been made to his bank account. After an investigation, it was discovered that a hacker had used the open network to access Louis’ work contacts and bank account.

What can you do?

To protect the information on your devices, you need to know the main vulnerabilities that hackers can exploit to their advantage:

  • Malicious apps: Many apps ask for more access to your device than is required. When you download an app, make sure to check how much access it has, and that the app has been made by a reputable developer.

In addition, always download an app from your device manufacturer’s official store. Apps downloaded from a website or mobile link are much more likely to contain malicious code.

  • Unsecured networks: Hackers can use public Wi-Fi and other unsecured networks to see all of your internet usage. Avoid using public networks when possible, and disconnect from a network immediately if your device prompts you with an unsecured network notification.
  • Outdated operating systems (OSs): If your device is running an outdated OS, it is not receiving new security measures from the device manufacturer. Frequently check your device for updates, and install them as soon as possible.

Get in touch

 No one wants to be in the position of having to tell a client his or her data has been compromised so it is worth reviewing your approach to cyber security. You may also wish to consider whether you have the appropriate insurance protection in place to support you if you were to fall victim to cyber-crime. If you would like a free review of your insurance please contact HETAS Insurance Services on 01905 886462 to see how they can help you.

 

HETAS Ltd is an introducer appointed representative of Jelf Insurance Brokers Limited. HETAS Insurance Services, Jelf and Jelf Clarke Roxburgh are trading names of Jelf Insurance Brokers Ltd (Reg No. 0837227), which is part of Jelf Group plc (Reg No. 2975376) and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).  Registered address: Hillside Court, Bowling Hill, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6JX (Registered in England and Wales). Not all products and services offered are regulated by the FCA. JIB375.12.16

 

Source Zywave: Safety Focused Newsletter September 2016

Could your business be at risk from employee theft? 

HETAS Insurance Services LogoNo-one likes to think that someone they employ and trust could break that trust by acting dishonestly, but unfortunately it can and does happen. You may not think of employee theft as a big threat, but there are several risks you should take into account. Consider how easy it would be for an employee to commit fraud or steal materials, tools or other equipment and the impact this could have on your business.

To prevent theft at your organisation, it’s worth considering the following:

  • Educate your employees about what is considered fraud and the consequences associated with it, and emphasise that the company has a zero tolerance policy
  • Deposit cash and reconcile all bank statements immediately
  • Consider using a payroll service to ensure accuracy
  • Regarding financial tasks, give different employees different jobs. Small companies often have one person as the sole bookkeeper, but this makes it easy for that individual to embezzle funds
  • Conduct internal audits of your books periodically and randomly, to ensure that everything adds up
  • Conduct thorough background checks on all your new employees
  • Have an inventory for your tools and equipment, and check to make sure everything is accounted for on a regular basis
  • Train site foremen to monitor employees and watch for suspicious behaviour. Any suspicious behaviour should be reported and further investigated

For more information or to discuss your insurance requirements please contact HETAS Insurance Services on 01905 886462 to see how they can help you.

 

 

Source: Zywave Risk Insights Construction: Preventing Employee Theft

HETAS Limited is an Introducer Appointed Representative of Jelf insurance Brokers.

Hetas Insurance Services is a trading name of Jelf Insurance Brokers Ltd (Reg No. 0837227), and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).  Registered address: Hillside Court, Bowling Hill, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6JX (Registered in England and Wales). Not all products and services offered are regulated by the FCA. JIB241.11.15

Falls from height: an occupational hazard or preventable risk?

HETAS Insurance Services LogoFalls from heights consistently rank as one of the most frequent—and most fatal—workplace accidents. In 2014/15[1]:

  • falls from height accounted for nearly three in ten fatal injuries to workers (41 out of 142);
  • almost half of fatal falls took place in construction (20 out of 41 fatal fall injuries);.
  • around half of the fatal fall injuries were to workers aged 55 or over (20 out of 40 falls, where the age was known), but less than a fifth of the working population is in this age band.

Lack of safety equipment responsible for dangerous fall

 It is clear that all work at height needs to be properly planned, supervised and carried out by people who are competent (having the skills, knowledge and experience) to do the job. This must include the right type of access equipment.

A Warwickshire-based firm was fined £10,000 and ordered to pay total costs of £1,229 and a victim surcharge of £120 after a worker sustained serious injuries from a 4-metre fall. The worker fell from a flimsy raised platform, sustaining injuries to his lungs and ribs and causing bleeding on his brain. In its investigation, the HSE found that the provided equipment lacked safety features and that the firm was guilty of breaching regulation 4(1) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005.

The do’s and don’ts of working at height

Do:

  • Review your insurance policy to check whether you are covered for working at height and whether there are any restrictions you need to consider.
  • Use work equipment to prevent falls /minimise the distance and consequence of a fall, where work at height cannot be avoided
  • Consider measures that protect all those at risk, or collective protection measures such as scaffolds, nets and soft landing systems, before you consider measures that only protect the individual, or personal protection measures such as harnesses
  • Make sure the surface/access equipment in use is stable and strong enough to support the worker’s weight and that of any equipment. Any edge protection should be wide enough and strong enough to prevent a fall.
  • Work as much as possible from the ground or partly from the ground. For example, assemble structures on the ground and lift them into position with lifting equipment.
  • Take precautions when working on or near fragile surfaces, such as an asbestos cement roof, to prevent a fall or to minimise the distance and reduce injuries in the event of a fall.
  • Ensure workers can get safely to and from where they want to work at height, and also consider emergency evacuation and rescue procedures.
  • Make sure everyone involved is competent to do the work they are responsible for, including those who plan and organise it.
  • Choose the most appropriate equipment for the type of work being done and how often it will be used.
  • Provide protection from falling objects.
  • Make sure equipment used for work at height is well maintained and inspected regularly.

Don’t:

  1. Overload ladders. The worker and anything he or she is taking up should not exceed the highest load stated on the ladder.
  2. Overreach on ladders or stepladders. Keep your belt buckle (navel) inside the stiles and both feet on the same rung throughout the task.
  3. Use ladders or stepladders if the nature of the work is deemed to be ‘heavy’ or if the task will take longer than 30 minutes to complete.
  4. Use ladders if workers cannot maintain three points of contact (two hands and one foot, or one hand and two feet) at the working position. If this is not possible, consider an alternative safe system of work.
  5. Let anyone who is not competent carry out work at height.

Click here to get in touch with HETAS Insurance Services.

Source Zywave Health and Safety recap Work at height

Zywave Construction CI Quarter 3 2015

HETAS Ltd is an introducer appointed representative of Jelf Insurance Brokers Limited. HETAS Insurance Services, Jelf and Jelf Clarke Roxburgh are trading names of Jelf Insurance Brokers Ltd (Reg No. 0837227), which is part of Jelf Group plc (Reg No. 2975376) and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).  Registered address: Hillside Court, Bowling Hill, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6JX (Registered in England and Wales). Not all products and services offered are regulated by the FCA. JIB015.02.16

[1] HSE Kinds of accident in Great Britain, 2014/2015 http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/causinj/kinds-of-accident.pdf.  Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence