The Right Firewood

The Right Firewood

The Right FirewoodYou will all be aware of the Woodsure Ready to Burn scheme that was launched back in 2017. Here, the Woodsure team provide us with an update on the scheme and its role in the recently published Clean Air Strategy 2019.

The recently announced Clean Air Strategy 2019 and while we still await the outcome of the August 2018 consultation on cleaner fuels, the strategy confirms that Government “will legislate to prohibit the sale of the most polluting fuels.”. Woodsure’s Ready to Burn scheme was identified as one of industry’s voluntary initiatives to tackle air pollution.

Ready to Burn

The Woodsure Ready to Burn initiative is for wood fuel producers (both firewood and briquettes), who are able to demonstrate through audit and fuel testing that wood fuel they sell as ‘Ready to Burn’ is:

  • Labelled as ‘Ready to Burn’
  • Is less than 20% moisture content
  • There is point of sale information, labelling and support
  • Where appropriate provides retailers with information on how to effectively store and keep the firewood in good condition

The Ready to Burn scheme is open to suppliers of all sizes and allows for both seasoned and force dried suppliers.

To join the scheme suppliers must undertake both an on-site audit and laboratory analysis of a representative sample of their product. In addition, the supplier must also demonstrate the legality of their product. Last year Woodsure produced some useful guidance for suppliers on how to demonstrate legality of firewood suppliers. Click here to find out more.

Once certificated Woodsure buy a number of samples of your product throughout the year. The more firewood you sell, the more checks are carried out. The mystery shopping ensures that once the fuel is produced, the quality is not reduced through poor storage or mishandling during the supply chain. This helps ensure consumers can choose the right firewood.

National Retailers

Back in October 2018 Woodsure worked in partnership with Defra during Green Great Britain Week to get major retailers to pledge to encourage customers to buy cleaner fuels. The following were some of the commitments made during the week.

Retailers are carrying out a wide range of actions to help consumers switch to cleaner, alternative fuels and the right firewood:

  • Lidl have committed to only sell wood that adheres to Woodsure conditions, meaning consumers have a guarantee that the fuel meets specified standards, including having the right moisture content and being sourced from sustainably managed woodland.
  • B&Q has trained store colleagues on the benefits of cleaner fuels and more efficient stoves and heaters to help educate their customers.
  • Asda has removed non-kiln dried wood logs and house coal from all of its London stores, guiding customers towards making better choices.
  • Tesco has produced in-store advertising promoting the benefits of “Ready to Burn” solid fuels and where to find them in store.
  • Booker, which provides stock for newsagents and convenience stores across the country, has confirmed it will be including “Ready to Burn” products as part of their autumn/winter range.

Woodsure continues to work with both suppliers and retailers to ensure that products that hold the Woodsure Ready to Burn mark will be properly stored and made available to customers at the correct moisture content.

Continued Growth

The Woodsure scheme continues to grow and the website saw record visitors during January 2019 following the announcement of the Government’s Clean Air Strategy. See our recent announcement on the strategy here.

Whilst the scheme remains focused on woodfuel quality, Woodsure has for some time encouraged Government to consider fuel quality alongside sustainability and legality.  With the current focus on air quality and part of the cause associated with wood burning both Defra and BEIS see the benefits of burning the right fuel to help reduce the impact on emissions from wood burning appliances.  The Woodsure wood fuel scheme and ENplus scheme for pellets are already recognised by Biomass Suppliers List, but BEIS and the BSL advisory panel are considering the benefits of further promoting fuel quality within BSL to ensure woodfuel sold to RHI boiler installations meet the expected fuel quality designed for the boiler. More should be known in the next few months.


Further Reading


 

Clean Air Strategy 2019

Government Announces Clean Air Strategy 2019

Clean Air Strategy 2019Today the Government published the Clean Air Strategy 2019, a key document in tackling air pollution, making our air healthier to breath, protecting nature and boosting the economy. The strategy looks at a range of actions to reduce emissions/pollution, including:

  • Transport
  • The home
  • Farming
  • Industry
  • Clean growth and innovation

For our industry, chapter 6 of the strategy is of real importance, actions to reduce emissions at home. One of the aims of the strategy is to raise awareness of the breadth of everyday activities that contribute to air pollution.

The government’s objective is to raise awareness of the potential impacts of air pollution at home and ensure that consumers are armed with reliable information enabling them to make informed choices to protect themselves, their families and their neighbours.

 As you will no doubt be aware open fires and wood burning stoves have risen in popularity over the years, providing an additional form of heating for many, and for some, the sole heat source. While emissions from domestic burning have reduced significantly since the 1950’s, there is more that can be done to reduce pollution.

What does the strategy tell us?

It is clear that not all forms of domestic burning are equally polluting. Appliances, how well they are used and maintained along with what fuels are used can all make a big difference to how much pollution is produced.

The strategy also identifies that “using cleaner fuels, in a cleaner appliance which is installed by a competent person, knowing how to operate it efficiently, and ensuring that chimneys are regularly swept, will all make a big difference”.

Strategy Key Actions

HETAS summarised many of the key developments in a post last year in a post about misleading headlines relating to the banning of wood stoves, with many of these points remaining applicable to the strategy.Here are the key action points from the Clean Air Strategy 2019.

  • Legislate to prohibit sale of the most polluting fuels

We have already seen the launch of Woodsure’s Ready to Burn scheme which now has a large number of accredited suppliers committed to the scheme and HETAS is updating it’s list of Approved smokeless fuels to meet future legislation requirements.

  • Ensure that only the cleanest stoves are available for sale by 2022

HETAS appliance approval is already recognising appliances that are ahead of the game and already Ecodesign compliant. By 2022 HETAS will only accept Ecodesign compliant stoves. HETAS also works with the SIA to list Ecodesign Ready Stoves on the website.

  • Make changes to existing smoke control legislation to make it easier to enforce

HETAS recognises that enforcement can be challenging so any developments made through the Environment Bill will be welcome. Dealing with polluters is an important step in improving air quality.

  • Give new powers to local authorities to take action in areas of high pollution

HETAS is keen to see a uniform approach across the UK to enforcement to avoid confusion, again with a focus on tackling polluters.

  • Work across government to look at opportunities to align work on air quality, clean growth and fuel poverty in future policy design

In recent years we have seen the important role Defra has in working with key industry organisations like HETAS, Woodsure, the Stove Industry Alliance and chimney sweeping organisations. It is pleasing to see a joined-up approach taken at government level regarding future policy.

  • Develop a dedicated communications campaign targeted at domestic burners, to improve awareness of the environmental impact of their actions

HETAS recognises the vital role our registrants play in any consumer awareness campaign. From retailers offering advice on the right appliance and fuel, installers commissioning appliances to sweeps and service engineers offering ongoing advice. HETAS along with Woodsure and other industry organisations continue to liaise with Defra on any awareness campaigns.

  • Work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market

Again, both HETAS and Woodsure are playing a key role in these developments. HETAS was recently awarded the Defra contract as the Contractor to provide technical support to enable it to meet its legal obligations under the Clean Air Act 1993, with effect from 1st December 2018. For now, ensure you check the HETAS approved fuels list for solid mineral fuels, Woodsure for woodfuels along with the manufacturer’s instructions for specific advice on what to burn.

HETAS will continue to update our registrants through our monthly newsletters and Technical Bulletins, all of which are available in the Technical Area of the website. We do expect further details on this strategy over the coming months, make sure you stay tuned to the website and newsletters for further updates.


Further Reading


 

Defra contract appointment

Defra contract appointment

Defra Contract AppointmentWe are pleased to announce that Defra has appointed HETAS as the Contractor to provide technical support to enable it to meet its legal obligations under the Clean Air Act 1993, with effect from 1st December 2018.

The Assessment of Appliances and Fuels contract will run until 31 March 2020, covering the requirements of sections 20 and 21 of the Clean Air Act 1993 and other associated sections.  Following this period, there will be an option to extend the contract for a further two years.

Under current legislation, the Clean Air Act controls smoke and emissions from domestic and small industrial sources and gives local authorities powers to create smoke control areas. In smoke control areas, it is an offence to emit smoke from the chimney of a building or acquire an ‘unauthorised fuel’ unless it is used on an ‘exempt’ appliance.

Perfect Fit

The award of the contract is a perfect fit for HETAS – the specialist organisation approving biomass and solid fuel heating appliances, fuels and services. Led by Bruce Allen, HETAS will provide the assessment of fuels and appliances for use in Smoke Control areas across the UK throughout the set period.

Bruce says, “We are delighted to have won this contract, allowing us to extend our work alongside Defra. The Clean Air Act 1993 is vital in addressing the needs of environment in the UK, and the Assessment of Appliances and Fuels is something HETAS places in high regard. To be managing this in conjunction with Defra is extremely important to us. We would also like to acknowledge the excellent work of the outgoing contractor Ricardo Energy and Environment, who has done a great job.”

HETAS operates a range of registration, certification and approval schemes covering solid fuel, wood and biomass installers, fuels and appliances. The new contract fits well in to the portfolio of technical and environmental activities. For further information on HETAS, visit www.hetas.co.uk.

To find out more or to make an application contact the team on smokecontrol@hetas.co.uk or call 01684 272990.


Further Reading

Details of the current Clean Air Act 1993 application procedures can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/smoke-control-area-rules.


 

Defra Consults

Defra Consults on Air QualityDefra consults on air quality

Defra has confirmed via its latest consultation that it isn’t looking to ban the use of stoves. They do want to know what you think about their proposals for helping householders move to cleaner fuels for domestic burning.

The Clean Air Strategy states that air pollution is the top environmental risk to human health in the UK. We often think of air pollution as being caused by transport or industrial level burning of fossil fuels. Now that the emissions from these sources has decreased, the relative importance of emissions from other sources has increased. The Strategy is clear that we now need to tackle these other sources of air pollution, including emissions caused by heating our homes.

So what is this latest consultation all about?

Launched in August and running through until mid-October this consultation is focused on cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood.

Using cleaner fuels in a cleaner appliance installed by a competent person, knowing how to operate it efficiently, and ensuring that chimneys are regularly swept by a professional or registered chimney sweep all make a big difference. Defra has developed simple guidance for all local authorities to share with residents on these simple steps and is working with industry to encourage householders to take action in all these areas.

This consultation gives more detail about the proposals set out in the Strategy, focusing on the domestic use of solid fuel in England considers what further steps can be taken to encourage households to make a change from dirtier to cleaner fuels, with some key areas of focus:

  • Consumers who burn traditional house coal switching to alternative fuels (e.g. low sulphur manufactured solid fuels);
  • Consumers switching from wet wood to dry wood (with a moisture content of 20% or less);
  • Introduction of sulphur limits and smoke emission limits for all manufactured solid fuels.

It is here that Defra confirms that “We are not considering banning domestic burning. The government recognises that households have installed wood-burning stoves and the government is not seeking to prevent their use or installation.”

 Our recent ‘Ban on wood stoves’ article helped clarify the direction Defra is working toward. Feel free to share this content on your social media channels and with you customers.

 Proposal

The proposals in this more detailed consultation include:

  • Restrictions on the sale of wet wood for domestic burning so that it can only be purchased in volumes over a specified cut-off point;
  • Applying sulphur standards and smoke emission limits to all solid fuels;
  • Phasing out the sale of bituminous or traditional house coal;

 This current consultation runs until Friday 12th October 2018.

HETAS and Woodsure will be contributing to the consultation and we encourage industry to do the same.

Consultation

To view all the information relating to the consultation and to contribute visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/air-quality-using-cleaner-fuels-for-domestic-burning.

The importance of chimney sweeping

The importance of chimney sweeping

The Importance of Chimney SweepingIn recent newsletters we discussed Defra’s Clean Air Strategy and what it means for our industry. This month we look at the importance of chimney sweeping and appliance maintenance in the strategy.

The Defra Clean Air Strategy which was launched back in May and runs through until the 14th August. In June and July we covered some key elements of the strategy and what it means for our industry, this included the popular ‘Ban on wood stoves’ article which has been shared widely on social media. Check out the articles in the following links:

Defra’s Clean Air Strategy

Ban on wood stoves | the truth of it all

The Clean Air Strategy

Defra’s Clean Air Strategy summarises actions to reduce emissions from domestic burning, clearly identifying there is no intention to ban wood burning stoves.

  • Legislate to prohibit sale of the most polluting fuels.
  • Ensure that only the cleanest stoves are available for sale by 2022.
  • Give new powers to local authorities to take action in areas of high pollution, bringing legislation into the 21st century with more flexible, proportionate enforcement powers.
  • Work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market.
  • Ensure that consumers understand what they can do to reduce their impact from burning.

The Importance of Chimney Sweeping

This month we focus on the importance of chimney sweeping and appliance maintenance within the strategy. HETAS has been liaising with Defra for some time encouraging Defra to engage with the chimney sweeping associations on this important issue.

In the recent ‘Call for Evidence’ it was identified to Defra that “chimney sweeps highlighted the point that how a stove is used can have a significant impact on emissions.” The strategy also goes on to state “The stove, fuel and chimney sweep industries have been proactive in recognising the benefits to them and their customers from promoting those fuels, stoves and actions which will reduce air quality impacts. This is making it easier for consumers to understand the benefits of cleaner fuels, appliances and chimneys.”

 On the importance of chimney sweeping and the role of professional chimney sweeps the strategy says “The way in which we use our stoves can have a big impact on air quality and how long the chimney and stove will last. A local professional sweep can help consumers get it right, ensuring that they get the most from their stoves and provide advice on optimum operation. This can help save money and avoid chimney fires.”

 Proactive Approach

The proactive approach from industry includes Woodsure’s Ready to Burn scheme and the Burnright campaign. Burnright was launched in March and is a chimney sweep led campaign. In July representatives from the Association of Professional, Independent Chimney Sweeps (APICS), the Guild of Master Chimney Sweeps, the Institute of Chimney Sweeps (ICS) and the National Association of Chimney Sweeps (NACS) met and pledged their support for the Burnright campaign. HETAS fully supports this approach from the associations and is hopeful this will drive this sector of our industry forward.

The recently formed Chimney Safety Group meet again this month as industry is working together to become part of the solution.

Read the full Clean Air Strategy here.

As always, stay tuned to our newsletters and the HETAS website for updates on the Clean Air Strategy, Chimney Safety Group and much more. The HETAS team is always happy to answer your queries and can be contacted on 01684 278170 or via our Contact page.

Ban on wood stoves? The truth of it all

Ban on wood stoves? The truth of it all

Ban on wood stoves | Clean Air StrategyNo doubt you will have all seen some misleading headlines in recent months about a possible ban on wood stoves. Here, we identify the truth behind the headlines and what you can tell customers who might have seen the headlines.

On the 22nd May 2018 the Environment Secretary Michael Gove published a Clean Air Strategy 2018 which aims to cut air pollution and save lives, backed up through new primary legislation. What does the strategy say and how will it impact you and your customers?

The new strategy, which is out for consultation until the 14th August, is a key part of Defra’s 25 Year Plan to leave our environment in a better state than we found it. HETAS, Woodsure and The Stove Industry Alliance have all been consulting with Defra for some time now and once again Defra has clarified they are not looking to implement a ban on wood stoves.

No ban on wood stoves | The key points

The Clean Air Strategy summarises actions to reduce emissions from domestic burning, clearly identifying there is no intention to ban wood burning stoves. Here are the key points:

  1. Legislate to prohibit sale of the most polluting fuels.
  2. Ensure that only the cleanest stoves are available for sale by 2022.
  3. Give new powers to local authorities to take action in areas of high pollution, bringing legislation into the 21st century with more flexible, proportionate enforcement powers.
  4. Work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market.
  5. Ensure that consumers understand what they can do to reduce their impact from burning.

The strategy also suggests Defra will give local authorities powers to go further in areas of high pollution, for example exploring what further steps government can take to enable local authorities to encourage ‘no burn days’ during high-pollution episodes.

Initiatives

The strategy identifies a number of voluntary initiatives that industry has undertaken to address concerns over air pollution from wood burning. These include Woodsure’s Ready to Burn, The SIA Ecodesign Ready scheme (administered by HETAS) and the Burnright campaign.

HETAS will continue to work with Defra and industry to drive forward policy and reduce air pollution from wood burning stoves. Defra would like your views on the actions being proposed to reduce air pollution and its effects, and to hear whether you have any further suggestions. Make sure you have your say at https://consult.defra.gov.uk/environmental-quality/clean-air-strategy-consultation/consultation/.

Back in June we summarised the Clean Air Strategy in more detail. Click here to read the article.

Stay tuned to the HETAS website, newsletters and social media channels for regular updates. Click here to get in touch with the team.


Update

14th January 2019: With the Government publishing it’s Clean Air Strategy 2019, click here to see the most recent news regarding wood burning stoves.


 

Defra’s Clean Air Strategy

Defra’s Clean Air Strategy

Defra Clean Air Strategy May 2018On the 22nd May the Environment Secretary Michael Gove published a Clean Air Strategy which aims to cut air pollution and save lives, backed up through new primary legislation. Here we demystify the strategy and look beyond the misleading headlines.

The new strategy, which is now out for consultation, is a key part of Defra’s 25 Year Plan to leave our environment in a better state than we found it. HETAS, Woodsure and The Stove Industry Alliance have all been consulting with Defra for some time now and once again Defra has clarified they are not looking to ban stoves.

This draft of the Clean Air Strategy outlines ambitions relating to reducing air pollution in the round, making our air healthier to breathe, protecting nature and boosting the economy. In this draft strategy, they set a clear direction for future air quality policies and goals. The strategy sits alongside three other important UK government strategies: Industrial Strategy, Clean Growth Strategy and the 25 Year Environment Plan. The Clean Air Strategy can be viewed in full by clicking here.

There are national emission reduction commitments for overall UK emissions of five damaging air pollutants. These are:

  • fine particulate matter (PM2.5)
  • ammonia (NH3)
  • nitrogen oxides (NOX)
  • sulphur dioxide (SO2)
  • and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs)

The announcement highlighted one area of particular concern is burning wood and coal to heat a home which contributes 38%* of UK emissions of damaging particulate matter. Cleaner fuels and stoves produce less smoke, less soot and more heat. In future only the cleanest domestic fuels will be available for sale. The Woodsure Ready to Burn scheme has been identified by Defra as the label to assist consumers in identifying firewood that is suitable for use.

*38% of UK primary PM emissions come from burning wood and coal in domestic open firesand solid fuel stoves, 12% comes from road transport (e.g. fuel related emissions and tyre and brake wear)10 and a further 13% comes from solvent use and industrial processes11 (e.g. steel making, brick making, quarries, construction). Between 1970 and 2016 primary PM10 emissions fell by 73%, and primary PM2.5 emissions fell by 78%. However, emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 have been relatively stable since 2009. The aim is to reduce emissions of PM2.5 against the 2005 baseline by 30% by 2020, and 46% by 2030.

The strategy sets out a number goals with a couple specific to our sector and can be viewed in full in Chapter 6 (from page 50) of the strategy. These include:

  • Point: 6.3.1 New powers for local government

Smoke control areas are specific areas, designated by local councils, where it is illegal to allow smoke emissions from the chimney of your building. In these areas you can only burn authorised fuels or use an appliance (e.g. a stove) which has been exempted for use in the area. Local authorities have advised that awareness of, and compliance with, smoke control area legislation is low and that few people make the link between domestic burning and air pollution. Some local authorities are working to raise awareness of smoke control areas and to re-assess their boundaries. However, they have told us that smoke control areas can be hard to enforce. That is why in future we will focus on a nationwide approach to smoke control which can be built upon as appropriate by local authorities. We will give local authorities powers to go further in areas of high pollution, for example exploring what further steps government can take to enable local authorities to encourage ‘no burn days’ during high-pollution episodes.

  • Point 6.3.2: Ensuring only the very cleanest stoves can be bought and installed

In 2022 new, tougher emissions standards will come into effect for all new domestic stoves. This will raise the standard of appliances across the whole country. These more stringent emission limit requirements for solid fuel appliances will need to be coupled with a more effective approach to testing. The government is consulting with UK industry and test houses on an approach that will better reflect the way appliances are used in people’s homes.

  • Point 6.3.3: Ensuring only the cleanest fuels are available for sale

We will simplify and update legislation to protect consumers so that only the cleanest fuels are available for sale. In January this year, government issued a Call for Evidence on domestic burning of house coal, smokeless coal, manufactured solid fuel and wet wood sold in small quantities for immediate use. The purpose was to identify appropriate action on wood which would enable people who buy wood in large quantities and season it at home to continue to do so, but to reduce the sale of wood that has not been seasoned or dried, which is highly polluting when burned. In addition, we wished to understand the impact of phasing out the sale of the most polluting mineral fuels, such as bituminous house coal or high-sulphur smokeless fuels. We will be taking the evidence and views submitted to develop a final proposal for legislative changes, and potential exemptions, which will be consulted upon in the summer. High sulphur content fuels are harmful to human health and the environment. They also cause damage to stoves and chimneys. At present the sulphur content of solid fuels is limited to 2% in smoke control areas but not elsewhere. It is hard for consumers to identify at point of sale whether a product is high sulphur or not. Government intends to extend this 2% sulphur limit nationwide to ensure that consumers are protected against cheaper, dirtier alternatives. In addition, new fuels are now entering the market made from a variety of wastes and recycled products. The government wishes to encourage innovation, but it is essential that all products are safe to use and that consumers understand what they are buying. Government will work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market.

Biomass boilers are also addressed in the strategy.

The strategy identifies a number of voluntary initiatives that industry has undertaken to address concerns over air pollution from wood burning. These include Woodsure’s Ready to Burn, The SIA Ecodesign Ready scheme (administered by HETAS) and the Burnright campaign.

The strategy summarises actions to reduce emissions from domestic burning, clearly identifying there is no intention to ban wood burning stoves.

  • Legislate to prohibit sale of the most polluting fuels.
  • Ensure that only the cleanest stoves are available for sale by 2022.
  • Give new powers to local authorities to take action in areas of high pollution, bringing legislation into the 21st century with more flexible, proportionate enforcement powers.
  • Work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market.
  • Ensure that consumers understand what they can do to reduce their impact from burning.

HETAS will continue to work with Defra and industry to drive forward policy and reduce air pollution from wood burning. So what happens next? We met with Defra last week and will continue to keep you updated on progress. Additionally Defra would like your views on the actions being proposed to reduce air pollution and its effects, and to hear whether you have any further suggestions. Have your say at https://consult.defra.gov.uk/environmental-quality/clean-air-strategy-consultation/consultation/.

The Clean Air Strategy can be viewed in full by clicking here.

In recent months the HETAS team has produced guidance for our registrants, including the following:

Stay tuned to the HETAS website and social media channels for regular updates. Click here to get in touch with the team.


 

Air Pollution in the news

Air Pollution in the news

Statement from HETAS

HETAS is aware that the news is full of stories about air quality and mixed within the greater problems of transport are dramatic headlines about wood-burning.

Both HETAS and Woodsure have been working with Defra over the last year providing support and solutions where our industry will be part of the solution rather than part of the problem.

The London Mayor’s office have been equally supportive of HETAS and Woodsure. If you read the articles that sit beneath the dramatic headlines you will see that there is no wish from Defra to ban stoves or wood-burning.

The key issuers are:

  • Burn the right fuel in the right appliance
  • DO NOT BURN WET WOOD – the Defra approach fully supports the Woodsure Ready to Burn scheme as explained in Technical Bulletin #9 sent out last month
  • HETAS would like to see old open fires and old stoves replaced with modern clean burn appliances like Defra exempt stoves, Ecodesign Ready stoves and pellet stoves which can be 80% cleaner in use with the right dry fuel – click here to search for appliances on the HETAS website
  • Installation and servicing by HETAS registered professionals is a major factor in getting installations and servicing right
  • HETAS Approved Chimney Sweeps should be used to sweep chimneys regularly
  • We strongly recommend the use of smokeless mineral fuels as they are low in sulphur and cleaner in use
  • Make use of the HETAS Advice leaflets, available online here, or order via the HETAS Shop
  • Find out more on the https://www.readytoburn.org/ website

All these things are incredibly important to our industry and we must educate consumers on fuel, proper installation, appliance use, proper maintenance and sweeping. Always check you’re the user instructions for your appliance or consult with the installer, retailer or chimney sweep on correct use.

The reduction in particulate emissions when using dry wood is incredible. This is the most positive message we can give out and it is based on scientific research. Dry wood is so much cleaner in use and makes stoves work at their best. Other emissions are also reduced markedly when using dry wood. The Woodsure Ready to Burn Scheme and logo gives assurance that the wood logs are up to 20% moisture content and therefore “ready to burn” now. Any wet wood must be seasoned/dried before use.

You can be reassured that HETAS and Woodsure are incredibly active and working closely with Government to get this right and to reduce environmental impact from solid fuel burning so that consumers can enjoy the benefits of solid fuel, wood, biomass without feeling concerned.

Installers, servicing businesses and chimney sweeps have the biggest part to play in educating consumers and therefore reducing environmental impact and protecting our industry.

Stay tuned for the HETAS June e-newsletter next week where we will be issuing further updates.

Click here to get in touch with the team at HETAS.

Visit Worcester at Hearth & Home

Visit Worcester at Hearth and Home

Having launched its range of Greenstyle stoves range last year, Worcester Bosch Group will be showcasing its latest products at this year’s Hearth and Home show – stand B12. Exhibiting at the show for the first time, the Greenstyle range suits both modern and traditional homes and, with a choice of outputs available, can effectively heat a variety of spaces.

Both the Greenstyle Bewdley and Hanbury stove ranges are:Visit Worcester at Hearth and Home

  • HETAS Approved
  • Defra exempt
  • Includes clean-burn technology
  • Backed by a renowned award-winning technical support team

For those looking to stock the new Greenstyle stoves, representatives will be able to field any questions about the products.

Martyn Bridges, Director of Technical Communication and Product Management at Worcester, Bosch Group, commented:

“We are delighted to be attending Hearth and Home for the very first time, and are excited to show off our new collection of Greenstyle stoves.

“Not only is Hearth and Home a great opportunity for us to get to know our stoves customers, it also offers them the chance to find out all they need to know about our latest offering.”

For further information on Worcester’s Greenstyle Bewdley and Hanbury wood burning stove, please visit www.worcester-bosch.co.uk.

Click here to view the Worcester Greenstlye stoves range on the HETAS product search.

Enhanced Appliance Search

HETAS Enhanced Appliance Search

In the January e-news HETAS introduced the Ecodesign Ready Scheme, a Stove Industry Alliance (SIA) scheme that is being overseen by HETAS, who will independently verify that the stoves meet the fundamental requirements of Ecodesign. Ecodesign Ready appliances can now be found on the HETAS search.

Ecodesign is the European-wide programme to lowering emissions. It is due to come into force in the UK in 2022. The main manufacturers in the SIA have decided to release stoves that will meet the lower emission limits now, six years early.

Ecodesign Ready Scheme

HETAS Enhanced Appliance SearchAs with HD ready TVs the Ecodesign Ready label will inform consumers that the stove will meet the new stringent emission limits.

The Ecodesign Ready scheme is supported by DEFRA. The SIA Ecodesign Ready label will set the standard for the most environmentally friendly stoves available today.

The scheme is being overseen by HETAS, who will independently verify that the stoves meet the fundamental requirements of Ecodesign. The stoves will also appear on the HETAS website search with the Ecodesign Ready label.

Independent tests have shown that an Ecodesign Ready stove produces 90% fewer emissions that an open fire and 84% fewer than a stove of ten years ago.

With the scheme due for a parliament launch on the 28th February, you can now search for Ecodesign Ready Appliances using the HETAS search facility. In addition, the search function has been further enhanced with new search options.  The ‘Find Product’ search now enables you to search using the following:

  • Manufacturer/Appliance Name
  • Product Type
  • Design Features: style/air control/hearth requirements/fuel operation/
  • Efficiency and Output
  • Additional Filters: auto ignition/outdoor installation/accumulator required
  • Certifications/Verification: HETAS/Defra/MCS/SIA Ecodesign Ready

The search results have also been enhanced with new icons which first featured in the 2016 HETAS Guide now available online, making the information on appliances easier to understand.

Take a look at the range of products using the search at: www.hetas.co.uk/find-appliance