Defra Consults

Defra Consults on Air QualityDefra consults on air quality

Defra has confirmed via its latest consultation that it isn’t looking to ban the use of stoves. They do want to know what you think about their proposals for helping householders move to cleaner fuels for domestic burning.

The Clean Air Strategy states that air pollution is the top environmental risk to human health in the UK. We often think of air pollution as being caused by transport or industrial level burning of fossil fuels. Now that the emissions from these sources has decreased, the relative importance of emissions from other sources has increased. The Strategy is clear that we now need to tackle these other sources of air pollution, including emissions caused by heating our homes.

So what is this latest consultation all about?

Launched in August and running through until mid-October this consultation is focused on cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels and wood.

Using cleaner fuels in a cleaner appliance installed by a competent person, knowing how to operate it efficiently, and ensuring that chimneys are regularly swept by a professional or registered chimney sweep all make a big difference. Defra has developed simple guidance for all local authorities to share with residents on these simple steps and is working with industry to encourage householders to take action in all these areas.

This consultation gives more detail about the proposals set out in the Strategy, focusing on the domestic use of solid fuel in England considers what further steps can be taken to encourage households to make a change from dirtier to cleaner fuels, with some key areas of focus:

  • Consumers who burn traditional house coal switching to alternative fuels (e.g. low sulphur manufactured solid fuels);
  • Consumers switching from wet wood to dry wood (with a moisture content of 20% or less);
  • Introduction of sulphur limits and smoke emission limits for all manufactured solid fuels.

It is here that Defra confirms that “We are not considering banning domestic burning. The government recognises that households have installed wood-burning stoves and the government is not seeking to prevent their use or installation.”

 Our recent ‘Ban on wood stoves’ article helped clarify the direction Defra is working toward. Feel free to share this content on your social media channels and with you customers.

 Proposal

The proposals in this more detailed consultation include:

  • Restrictions on the sale of wet wood for domestic burning so that it can only be purchased in volumes over a specified cut-off point;
  • Applying sulphur standards and smoke emission limits to all solid fuels;
  • Phasing out the sale of bituminous or traditional house coal;

 This current consultation runs until Friday 12th October 2018.

HETAS and Woodsure will be contributing to the consultation and we encourage industry to do the same.

Consultation

To view all the information relating to the consultation and to contribute visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/air-quality-using-cleaner-fuels-for-domestic-burning.

Hearth and Home time

Hearth & Home time!

HETAS at Hearth and HomeIt’s that time of year when the HETAS team head up to Harrogate for the annual Hearth & Home exhibition. You’ll find HETAS and Woodsure in our usual position in Hall C. Come and meet the team and pick up the latest Technical Bulletin which will be hot off the press.

Hearth & Home Exhibition 2018 brings together all sectors of the hearth industry, providing an exciting environment that offers trade professionals the opportunity to network and meet each other. Visitors can expect to see industry leading demonstrations, new innovations and product launches, while exhibitors benefit from a valuable and enthusiastic audience of industry professionals.

Taking place at the Harrogate Convention Centre there are three halls of new products and services. David Spencer, exhibition director comments “The halls will be packed with the very latest the industry has to offer. Whether you are an independent retailer, installer, builder, architect, interior designer, chimney sweep, distributor or agent, a trip to Harrogate is a valuable opportunity to stay one step ahead of the competition by seeing the latest trends and ordering new product lines, exclusive exhibition deals and offers.”

HETAS is pleased to be exhibiting at Hearth & Home once again and you can catch up with the team in Hall C in our usual position. We will be supported by Amanda from Woodsure who will be discussing the Defra supported Ready to Burn initiative.

Latest Technical Bulletin

HETAS registrants can pick up the latest Technical Bulletin which will be hot off the press at the exhibition and the technical team will be on hand to talk through your technical questions. We will also be discussing the recently announced Clean Air Strategy and what this means for our industry.

Don’t forget to bring along their ID cards for a chance to win in our registrant raffle. We’ve been picking up prizes from across the industry, but you must have your ID card available to enter!

Find out more

Doors to the exhibition open on Sunday 10th June at 10am. For more details visit https://www.hearthandhome.co.uk/.

Click here to sign up for free tickets.

 

Defra’s Clean Air Strategy

Defra’s Clean Air Strategy

Defra Clean Air Strategy May 2018On the 22nd May the Environment Secretary Michael Gove published a Clean Air Strategy which aims to cut air pollution and save lives, backed up through new primary legislation. Here we demystify the strategy and look beyond the misleading headlines.

The new strategy, which is now out for consultation, is a key part of Defra’s 25 Year Plan to leave our environment in a better state than we found it. HETAS, Woodsure and The Stove Industry Alliance have all been consulting with Defra for some time now and once again Defra has clarified they are not looking to ban stoves.

This draft of the Clean Air Strategy outlines ambitions relating to reducing air pollution in the round, making our air healthier to breathe, protecting nature and boosting the economy. In this draft strategy, they set a clear direction for future air quality policies and goals. The strategy sits alongside three other important UK government strategies: Industrial Strategy, Clean Growth Strategy and the 25 Year Environment Plan. The Clean Air Strategy can be viewed in full by clicking here.

There are national emission reduction commitments for overall UK emissions of five damaging air pollutants. These are:

  • fine particulate matter (PM2.5)
  • ammonia (NH3)
  • nitrogen oxides (NOX)
  • sulphur dioxide (SO2)
  • and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs)

The announcement highlighted one area of particular concern is burning wood and coal to heat a home which contributes 38%* of UK emissions of damaging particulate matter. Cleaner fuels and stoves produce less smoke, less soot and more heat. In future only the cleanest domestic fuels will be available for sale. The Woodsure Ready to Burn scheme has been identified by Defra as the label to assist consumers in identifying firewood that is suitable for use.

*38% of UK primary PM emissions come from burning wood and coal in domestic open firesand solid fuel stoves, 12% comes from road transport (e.g. fuel related emissions and tyre and brake wear)10 and a further 13% comes from solvent use and industrial processes11 (e.g. steel making, brick making, quarries, construction). Between 1970 and 2016 primary PM10 emissions fell by 73%, and primary PM2.5 emissions fell by 78%. However, emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 have been relatively stable since 2009. The aim is to reduce emissions of PM2.5 against the 2005 baseline by 30% by 2020, and 46% by 2030.

The strategy sets out a number goals with a couple specific to our sector and can be viewed in full in Chapter 6 (from page 50) of the strategy. These include:

  • Point: 6.3.1 New powers for local government

Smoke control areas are specific areas, designated by local councils, where it is illegal to allow smoke emissions from the chimney of your building. In these areas you can only burn authorised fuels or use an appliance (e.g. a stove) which has been exempted for use in the area. Local authorities have advised that awareness of, and compliance with, smoke control area legislation is low and that few people make the link between domestic burning and air pollution. Some local authorities are working to raise awareness of smoke control areas and to re-assess their boundaries. However, they have told us that smoke control areas can be hard to enforce. That is why in future we will focus on a nationwide approach to smoke control which can be built upon as appropriate by local authorities. We will give local authorities powers to go further in areas of high pollution, for example exploring what further steps government can take to enable local authorities to encourage ‘no burn days’ during high-pollution episodes.

  • Point 6.3.2: Ensuring only the very cleanest stoves can be bought and installed

In 2022 new, tougher emissions standards will come into effect for all new domestic stoves. This will raise the standard of appliances across the whole country. These more stringent emission limit requirements for solid fuel appliances will need to be coupled with a more effective approach to testing. The government is consulting with UK industry and test houses on an approach that will better reflect the way appliances are used in people’s homes.

  • Point 6.3.3: Ensuring only the cleanest fuels are available for sale

We will simplify and update legislation to protect consumers so that only the cleanest fuels are available for sale. In January this year, government issued a Call for Evidence on domestic burning of house coal, smokeless coal, manufactured solid fuel and wet wood sold in small quantities for immediate use. The purpose was to identify appropriate action on wood which would enable people who buy wood in large quantities and season it at home to continue to do so, but to reduce the sale of wood that has not been seasoned or dried, which is highly polluting when burned. In addition, we wished to understand the impact of phasing out the sale of the most polluting mineral fuels, such as bituminous house coal or high-sulphur smokeless fuels. We will be taking the evidence and views submitted to develop a final proposal for legislative changes, and potential exemptions, which will be consulted upon in the summer. High sulphur content fuels are harmful to human health and the environment. They also cause damage to stoves and chimneys. At present the sulphur content of solid fuels is limited to 2% in smoke control areas but not elsewhere. It is hard for consumers to identify at point of sale whether a product is high sulphur or not. Government intends to extend this 2% sulphur limit nationwide to ensure that consumers are protected against cheaper, dirtier alternatives. In addition, new fuels are now entering the market made from a variety of wastes and recycled products. The government wishes to encourage innovation, but it is essential that all products are safe to use and that consumers understand what they are buying. Government will work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market.

Biomass boilers are also addressed in the strategy.

The strategy identifies a number of voluntary initiatives that industry has undertaken to address concerns over air pollution from wood burning. These include Woodsure’s Ready to Burn, The SIA Ecodesign Ready scheme (administered by HETAS) and the Burnright campaign.

The strategy summarises actions to reduce emissions from domestic burning, clearly identifying there is no intention to ban wood burning stoves.

  • Legislate to prohibit sale of the most polluting fuels.
  • Ensure that only the cleanest stoves are available for sale by 2022.
  • Give new powers to local authorities to take action in areas of high pollution, bringing legislation into the 21st century with more flexible, proportionate enforcement powers.
  • Work with industry to identify an appropriate test standard for new solid fuels entering the market.
  • Ensure that consumers understand what they can do to reduce their impact from burning.

HETAS will continue to work with Defra and industry to drive forward policy and reduce air pollution from wood burning. So what happens next? We met with Defra last week and will continue to keep you updated on progress. Additionally Defra would like your views on the actions being proposed to reduce air pollution and its effects, and to hear whether you have any further suggestions. Have your say at https://consult.defra.gov.uk/environmental-quality/clean-air-strategy-consultation/consultation/.

The Clean Air Strategy can be viewed in full by clicking here.

In recent months the HETAS team has produced guidance for our registrants, including the following:

Stay tuned to the HETAS website and social media channels for regular updates. Click here to get in touch with the team.

Air Pollution in the news

Air Pollution in the news

Statement from HETAS

HETAS is aware that the news is full of stories about air quality and mixed within the greater problems of transport are dramatic headlines about wood-burning.

Both HETAS and Woodsure have been working with Defra over the last year providing support and solutions where our industry will be part of the solution rather than part of the problem.

The London Mayor’s office have been equally supportive of HETAS and Woodsure. If you read the articles that sit beneath the dramatic headlines you will see that there is no wish from Defra to ban stoves or wood-burning.

The key issuers are:

  • Burn the right fuel in the right appliance
  • DO NOT BURN WET WOOD – the Defra approach fully supports the Woodsure Ready to Burn scheme as explained in Technical Bulletin #9 sent out last month
  • HETAS would like to see old open fires and old stoves replaced with modern clean burn appliances like Defra exempt stoves, Ecodesign Ready stoves and pellet stoves which can be 80% cleaner in use with the right dry fuel – click here to search for appliances on the HETAS website
  • Installation and servicing by HETAS registered professionals is a major factor in getting installations and servicing right
  • HETAS Approved Chimney Sweeps should be used to sweep chimneys regularly
  • We strongly recommend the use of smokeless mineral fuels as they are low in sulphur and cleaner in use
  • Make use of the HETAS Advice leaflets, available online here, or order via the HETAS Shop
  • Find out more on the https://www.readytoburn.org/ website

All these things are incredibly important to our industry and we must educate consumers on fuel, proper installation, appliance use, proper maintenance and sweeping. Always check you’re the user instructions for your appliance or consult with the installer, retailer or chimney sweep on correct use.

The reduction in particulate emissions when using dry wood is incredible. This is the most positive message we can give out and it is based on scientific research. Dry wood is so much cleaner in use and makes stoves work at their best. Other emissions are also reduced markedly when using dry wood. The Woodsure Ready to Burn Scheme and logo gives assurance that the wood logs are up to 20% moisture content and therefore “ready to burn” now. Any wet wood must be seasoned/dried before use.

You can be reassured that HETAS and Woodsure are incredibly active and working closely with Government to get this right and to reduce environmental impact from solid fuel burning so that consumers can enjoy the benefits of solid fuel, wood, biomass without feeling concerned.

Installers, servicing businesses and chimney sweeps have the biggest part to play in educating consumers and therefore reducing environmental impact and protecting our industry.

Stay tuned for the HETAS June e-newsletter next week where we will be issuing further updates.

Click here to get in touch with the team at HETAS.

Is your fuel legal?

Is your fuel legal?

Recently the Woodsure team provided an update to its members on the legality of woodfuel. The article is really insightful and we wanted to share the update with installers, retailers and sweeps so you can check with your suppliers.

When finding a supplier of the raw material, ensure that they can provide you with proof of Legality and sustainability this can be by the following:-

  • FSC, PEFC or other recognised voluntary certification scheme
  • Management plan in place & valid felling licence
  • Risk Based Regional Assessment (RBRA)

If purchasing from a company who is a member of a voluntary certification scheme it is important to ensure that the licence is valid for the supply you receive.  This can be checked on the relevant scheme website, such as FSC. Simply enter the details and check the product type is valid for what you are being supplied. A description of corewood, rough wood is fine, but if it states card or paper alarm bells should ring as a wrong licence number may have been given.

If purchasing timber that is not covered by a certification scheme, then we recommend that you use one of the other two methods to demonstrate legality.  Felling licences are given for felling on the licensed area of land they are granted for.  There are different types of permission to fell trees: health and safety, planning permission, Statutory Plant Health Notices or thinning of woodland.  Licences can be issued for one off activities or associated with a management plan.  A licence cannot be extended beyond its expiry date and its FREE OF CHARGE to apply for one! A felling licence associated with a management plan normally lasts 5 or 10 years.

RBRA can be used when receiving volumes of timber from within a region.  It assesses the risk of the timber coming from sustainable sources.  The Biomass Suppliers List and Confor have a template that can be used for timber being sourced within the UK and guidance on RBRAs on the government website for those sourcing from outside the UK.  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/woodfuel-guidance-version-2

We recommend all Woodsure accredited businesses should request that their timber supplier demonstrates proof of legality and sustainability. It is suggest you record all your suppliers on a simple spreadsheet document showing name, address, licence number, validity date and that you have some form of checking in case licences are revoked, perhaps check the licence numbers every quarter.

Importing Wood fuel

There are two things that you need to ensure when importing firewood into the UK: the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR), and the Statutory Firewood Notification Scheme.

Any wood coming into the EU needs to comply with the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR), which came into force on 3rd March 2013. The regulation affects all who first place timber on the EU market, plus those further down the supply chain.   Anyone importing wood into the UK is affected by this and must show that they have practices in place to ensure the legality of the wood being imported, even as a finished product. A due diligence system must be in place for anyone importing and to comply the minimum requirements are:

  • Full information on the supplier
  • Assessment that the timber being imported is legal and applies to regulation
  • Checked and identified any risks by obtaining any additional information to verify legality.

Templates for this can be found on the Forestry Commission England website.

For those who buy and sell wood further down the supply chain it is essential to record where you buy from and who you sell to.

Firewood notification came into force on 1st January 2017 to assist the Forestry Commission in assessing the pest-risk represented by the trade in fuel wood.  All relevant consignments, irrespective of size/weight, must be notified at least 3 working days prior to landing.  Notification of landing is a statutory requirement and failure to comply is a contravention of the Plant Health (Forestry) Order 2015.  In addition, certain species will also require a Plant Passport.

For more advice on this topic get in touch with the team on 01684 278188 or email info@woodsure.co.uk

Useful Links

Here are some other useful links on this topic:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/eu-timber-regulation-guidance-for-business-and-industry

http://www.fsc-uk.org/en-uk/about-fsc

https://www.pefc.org/

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/publicregisters

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/england-fellinglicences

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/FellingLicenceFAQJuly2005.pdf/$FILE/FellingLicenceFAQJuly2005.pdf

Latest news from the SIA

Latest news from the SIA

If asked the question Are the PM emissions from wood burning increasing or decreasing, you might well have answered increasing. A new study from Kings College London has shown that across the country PM from wood burning is going down, even with increasing stove sales.

The main reason given for drop in emissions is the replacement of open fires and older stoves with more modern appliances that produce lower amounts of particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5). The study headed by Dr. Gary Fuller looked at the wood burning emissions across most of the main cities in the UK between 2009 and 2014. Most cities showed a decrease in emissions over the period

The outcome of the study reflects the fact that only DEFRA Exempt stoves, with emissions that meet strict DEFRA limits on emissions, can be installed in smoke control areas. The reduction may not have been as great as we would all have liked, as the decrease in emissions is partly offset by the continued use of open fires to burn wood. Although burning wood in an open fire in a smoke control area is not permitted under the Clean Air Act, 70% of the wood burnt in London is on an open fire.

New Ecodesign regulations will come into effect in 2022, and the Stove Industry Alliance (SIA) has already worked with stove manufacturers to have an accredited list of SIA Ecodesign Ready appliances that already meet these new regulations right now.

Burning wood on an open fire is the worst way to burn wood, both from point of view of heat generated and the emissions produced. An SIA Ecodesign Ready stove can reduce PM emissions by 90% compared to an open fire, 80% compared to a 10-year-old stove and over 40% when compared with a DEFRA Exempt stove.

The Stove Industry Alliance (SIA) has proposed an upgrade scheme that would help consumers make the move from an open fire or an older stove to an Ecodesign Ready stove. This could help accelerate the introduction of Ecodesign Ready stoves and the reduction in emissions.

HETAS, the SIA, Woodsure and other industry organisations are continuing to work together to tackle the issues of air quality relating to wood burning.

 

 

The Importance of Quality Fuel

The Importance of Quality Fuel

Case Studies

Will Richardson of Rural Development Initiatives talks to HETAS about the importance of quality fuel and the initiatives in place for woodfuel suppliers, from Woodsure and Ready to Burn to Grown in Britain.

We are all familiar with the importance of producing and using the highest quality woodfuels – improved efficiency, reduced emissions, reduced wear and tear on appliances to name a few. Policy makers and enforcers are following the woodfuel industry with interest as more and more woodfuel burning appliances are installed and more and more woodfuel is being burned.

A number of Woodsure accredited suppliers in the north of England have been working hard to achieve top quality supply chains and I’ve set out below a couple of case studies on two different firewood suppliers using different production techniques to get consistently high quality fuel.

The Importance of Quality FuelDelamere Logs

Delamere Logs at Norley, Cheshire created in 2010, is harvesting logs from its own land, as well as from the surrounding area, and is contributing to the local environment and economy. They have not only committed to Woodsure accreditation but have also achieved the Grown in Britain Standard, with both marks allowing them to demonstrate both the quality and locality of the product.

“Grown in Britain licensing guarantees that our firewood is all-British in origin,” says Will Starkey, partner at Delamere Logs. “The brand is a sign that timber products are sourced from managed British woodlands. Imported firewood can bring the threat of unwanted pests and diseases. Supporting British-grown timber and wood products removes such concerns and helps maintain jobs in rural economies here at home. Managing woodland correctly also benefits wildlife”.

Delamere Logs is an offshoot of the Starkey’s family farming business. The farm’s woodlands have always contributed to its livelihood, but brothers Sam and Will Starkey decided to create Delamere Logs in response to the growing market for woodfuel following the introduction of the government’s Renewable Heat Incentive.

Will and Sam rely on traditional natural seasoning of their firewood product. Small diameter hardwood roundwood is bought into their yard where it is stacked on bearers in an exposed location for 6 to 9 months before being processed direct into potato crates. Here the split firewood is stored for no less than 12 months in order to achieve consistent average moisture content levels of less than 20%. The advantages of natural seasoning is a much reduced initial capital outlay but the trade off is a very long lead in time from processing the timber to selling the finished product to the customer.

The Importance of Quality FuelWoodfuel Barn

Woodfuel Barn at High Spen, Tyne and Wear, have been producing high quality firewood since 2009. Peter Stenner decided to create the business in response to the growing market for wood fuel as he realized a need for producing a sustainable local service to meet the increasing demand for great value dry logs. The business has been Woodsure accredited since 2015 and also holds Grown in Britain certification.

The business concentrates on kiln drying their product. In 2010 it was decided to install a biomass powered kiln drying logs down to very low moisture which are ideal for modern wood burning stoves. These logs not only burn extremely well but they are also a clean burn so they do not produce as much soot. The biomass used in the boiler is a by-product of the wood processing used in the production of the logs making the process efficient and sustainable. Consistent average moisture contents of less than 17% are achieved. The advantages and disadvantages of kiln drying are reversed to those of natural seasoning – high capital outlay compared to a very quick product turnaround time.

Of course, these case studies aren’t to say that a combination of both techniques can be used – initial air drying followed by finishing the product off in a kiln. Additionally, different types of kilning processes can be used including solar powered kilns such as poly tunnels. But both case studies demonstrate the commitment many businesses have made to the production of quality assured woodfuel giving consumers and policy makers confidence in our industry to deliver.

Grown in Britain’s Northern Group Scheme, of which Delamere Logs and Woodfuel Barn are members, is managed by Will Richardson of RDI Associates: “With the recent introduction of ash die back disease to the UK it’s critical that we all do what we can to reduce the potential spread of other pests and diseases from imported firewood,” he says. “Buying Grown in Britain licensed wood products, such as Delamere’s and Wood Fuel Barn’s woodfuel, householders and businesses can be assured of British traceability. This linked with Woodsure assurance gives customers complete peace of mind that their product is of the highest quality. They will also be helping to create a sustainable future for our forests and woodlands.”

Find out more

Click here to find out more about gaining accreditation with Woodsure and Ready to Burn.

Click here to find your local supplier on the HETAS Woodfuel Search.

The Grown in Britain brand identifies wood that has been grown in Britain and assured through their all new licensing scheme. Click here to find out more.

RDI is a highly experienced project management, consultancy and training service provider working at the forefront of sustainable rural development. Visit the RDI website.

Is your wood Ready to Burn?

Is your firewood Ready to Burn?

Ready to Burn LogoInstallation of a stove can be a whole new experience for many homeowners with a lot of information to take in.  HETAS in partnership with Woodsure aims to eliminate the confusion surrounding what wood to burn.  We have launch a scheme called “Ready to Burn” and it enables homeowners to have confidence in the wood they are buying.

Moisture Content

Any wood displaying the Ready to Burn logo will have 20% moisture content or less and once you get it home it is “Ready to Burn”, safe in the knowledge that it will not be causing damage to their appliance and in addition will be reducing harmful emissions into the atmosphere.

We believe that there will be many benefits; appliances will function as they should, the environment will benefit from the reduction of harmful particulates from burning wet or unseasoned wood and homeowners will have the assurance that wood bearing the Ready to Burn logo is exactly that, ready-to-burn! If the right fuel is not used in appliances; the once-beautiful stove becomes ineffective, smokes and smoulders and over time creosote builds up in the appliance and flue.

Ready to Burn Suppliers

For more information and stockist, please visit the ‘Ready to Burn‘ and Woodsure websites.

HETAS also has a range of consumer advice leaflets which can be viewed at www.hetas.co.uk/consumer/hetas-advice.

Hitting the front pages!

Hitting the front pages!

You will have all seen the misleading headlines last week that suggest London Mayor has called for a ban on wood burning stoves. We wanted to keep our registrants up to speed on what is actually being said and the work industry is doing to tackle air pollution.

westminster landscape

Air Quality

The London Mayor’s Office Air Quality Team has contacted HETAS and Woodsure, our sister company looking after wood fuel quality. They were clear that the Mayor Sadiq Kahn is not proposing a ban on stoves. He is concerned about the various pollution sources like diesel, brake wear, tyre wear, and particulates from open fires and old stoves. It is his intention to look at some areas of London and consider whether areas e.g. close to schools – may have times when they are zero emissions zones. So for parts of the year, there may be some times when pollution emitting activities are reduced. These things are at consultation stage and no final decisions have been made.

Product Approval

HETAS has a Product Approval system that includes easy ways to identify the cleanest appliances and Woodsure has implemented the “Ready to Burn” dry wood log scheme as scientific studies have found that dryer wood fuel (up to 20% moisture content) reduces environmental impact greatly making stoves and wood-burning a safe, efficient and practical form of heat that can be used whilst being part of the environmental solution rather than being the problem.

Ready to Burn Latest News

Ready to Burn Latest News

Ready to Burn Latest NewsYou spoke: We Listened!

Following a recent governance meeting for the Ready to Burn initiative, it was agreed that the scheme would accredit suppliers based on a moisture content of 20% or less.

Burning dry wood on modern stoves can further significantly reduces the amount of particle emissions and improve air quality compared to burn wet wood on open fires.

Moisture Content

The Ready to Burn certification mark is available to wood log suppliers who demonstrate to Woodsure their firewood logs have a moisture content consistently below 20%.  Note: whilst less than 20% is a key requirement of the scheme the message we are promoting to consumers’ and the industry is to burn dry wood fuel, ie the message is: burn wood fuel that is dry and ‘ready to burn’. The scheme is open to firewood and briquette suppliers who we are expecting to supply ready to burn fuel.

The scheme focuses on fuel that is purchased with the intent to burn within a short period of time; including small pre-packed retail woodfuel bags, and bulk delivery bags less than 2m3. Any suppliers offering the sale of wood for seasoning should contact Woodsure to talk through our other wood schemes options.

The scheme has the support of DefraHETAS, the Stove Industry Alliance and Industry representatives, including large producers of pre-packed woodfuel have committed to a scheme that will clearly identify the wood that is ready to burn at the point of sale. Woodsure and HETAS will raise awareness for wood fuel consumers to only burn low moisture, ready to burn firewood.

Scheme requirements

The ‘Ready to Burn’ initiative is for wood log suppliers, having a distinct certification category for dry firewood logs where they are able to demonstrate through audit and point of sale moisture checks that woodfuel they sell as ‘Ready to Burn’ is:

  • Labelled as ‘Ready to Burn’
  • Is less than 20% moisture content
  • There is point of sale information, labelling and support
  • Where appropriate, retailers provide information on how to effectively store and keep the firewood in good condition

Is your firewood Ready to Burn? Contact the Woodsure team on 01684 278188 or click here to complete an enquiry form.

Find out more about Woodsure: Click here to subscribe to their quarterly newsletters.